Afghanistan: 3 Books and a Song

The Sewing Circles of Herat by Christina Lamb

Christina Lamb is a foreign correspondent with a close relationship to Afghanistan and its people. Long before the current crisis of the west’s longest war-without-end, Lamb was reporting from Afghanistan.

During the time of the Russian invasion of more than 30 years ago, she travelled with the Mujahedeen fighters opposing the Russian forces. Some of those Afghan travel companions afterwards became Taliban members, another of them became the Afghan President.

This book looks at the complexities of Afghanistan from the time of the Russian war through to more recent, post-Taliban years.

The book’s title refers to a group of women in the city of Herat, who took the risk of studying during the Talban’s rule, under the cover of holding a sewing circle. Those women reflect the persistence, the resilience and the stubbornness of one group of Afghan people determined to live their lives no matter what outsiders may try to inflict upon them

A Thousand Splendid Suns, by Kahled Hosseini

Kahled Hosseini came to attention through his book The Kite Runner a book about male friendship and betrayal before and during the Taliban’s rule. This is his second book and this time his main characters are Afghan women of different generations, both of whom become married to the same man.
While the women’s relationship starts with resentment, shared experience binds them closer together.

This book also stretches across Afghanistan’s different political eras but starts well before the Russian invasion and ends after the Taliban was driven out. The changing politics also reflects in the changing attitudes and opportunities faced by Afghan women during the decades spanned by the story.

Beneath the Pale Blue Burqa, by Kay Danes

In December 2000, Kay Danes’ husband Kerry (the Laos based managing director of a British security company) was abducted by the Lao secret police and attempts were made to get him to make false accusations against one of his clients. Soon afterwards Kay was arrested and imprisoned to increase pressure on her husband. They spent nearly a year in custody, a year of being subjected to torture and mock executions, while diplomatic wrangling went on to secure their eventual release.

After such an experience it may be hard to understand why less than a decade later Kay would choose to work in Afghanistan, especially after suffering years of PTSD following the Laos imprisonment. But her experience and recovery motivated her towards involvement in humanitarian issues, where she could make use of the public profile her experience had given her.
Then, in 2008 she was approached about a planned visit to an Afghan women’s prison in Jalalabad…

Just don’t tell mum I’m going to a war zone.


(lyrics here:Good Morning Freedom)

Kabul Dreams holds to the claim of being the first rock band from Afghanistan; established in 2008 in Kabul.

All of the band members were born in Afghanistan, but they were displaced to different neighbouring countries as refugees during the Taliban reign: Iran, Pakistan and Uzbekistan, returning to meet and establish the band after the Taliban fell.

In 2014, the band relocated to Oakland, California where they recorded and released their second album.


Christina Lamb

Another interesting video featuring Christina Lamb, author of Nujeen, mentioned in my previous post

Hope and Persistence

These two books show humanity at its worst.

Firstly through the evils of the war in Syria that has made so much of that country impossible to live in.
Secondly through the treatment of those trying to flee the horrors inflicted upon their homeland by both governments and terror groups.
And lastly by the western nations that again close their doors to people in desperate need.

But despite all of that, many of those who have needed to flee from everything they’ve known, worked for and loved, have somehow drawn on those rare human virtues that can lie dormant until adversity of the worst kind is experienced.













Part of the story of A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea by Melissa Fleming is perhaps better told by the author herself in this video.

And the story of Nujeen Mustafa: