“My War”

At one time I considered the Vietnam war to be “my” war.

Not because of any real personal or family connection, but because it was going on when my family decided to migrate to Australia, and Australia was one of the combatants; taking its usual stance to support the USA in all of its major military ventures, whether that support was justified or not.

So, at the age of 13 we moved to a country at war, where conscription was practiced.

I was still 5 years away from what I thought was conscription eligibility, but at that time who knew how long the war would continue? (Conscription was actually from age 20, so I was two years out in my expectations). If it continued long enough I could have found myself being sent away to fight.

Then in December 1972 Australian conscription was brought to an end by the new Labor government within days of their taking power. They also stopped Australia’s involvement in the war.

Recently I watched a 10 part documentary series about Vietnam,; a fascinating insight into the history behind it, how American involvement came about, and the political lies that helped perpetuate it.

The series also looked at he increasing opposition to the war within the USA at a pivotal time of cultural change.

Some of what was going on in America was no less disturbing than what was happening in the war itself, with Government violence on American soil leading to tragedies like the killing of students at Kent State, a well-known event I’d heard about decades ago, but not an isolated or unique case of its type.

One thing that stood out in one of the early episodes, was the sense of deja vu I had when I learned how America had backed Ho Chi Minh and his rebel forces during WWII when the future North Vietnamese leader was fighting to free his country from the Japanese invader. Apart from the “irony” of the US later usurping that role as invader, the similarity to another situation a few decades later was obvious; when the US financed and trained the future leaders of Al Qaeda in their attempt to free Afghanistan from  Russian invaders, and then went on the be the invaders themselves, under attack from the very people they had trained and armed in the past.

Watching that series inspired me to return to a book I’d put aside a few years ago. View From A Low Bough by Barrie Crowley, is about the author’s personal experiences in Vietnam.

Vietnam Campaign Medal
Vietnam Medal awarded by the Sth. Vietnamese Govt. to US and Australian personnel after 6 months service

 
Once again I’m not finding it an easy read, but I’m determined not to give up this time. Crowley tries to write as if he’s taking the reader on a personal tour of events and places, to see hear and smell the war he experienced. The style doesn’t always work for me, but I appreciate his interesting insights into life in camp and out on patrol. Enough to make me very grateful that it didn’t become MY war.

The book is also full of “Strong Coarse Language” – as it would be described on an Australian DVD censor’s classification. But that seems appropriate in the context of young men thrown together in a harsh environment, witnessing, or involved in some of the worst aspects of human behaviour, for reasons they could never hope understand.
If they understood would they have gone along with the corrupt political hypocrisy that had sent them there? Even so, they were not blind to the ineptitude and irrationality of those directing the course of the war.

From View From  A Low Bough

“Hearts and Minds, one of the programs was called, one of the greatest abuses of the English language ever perpetrated. It worked this way. Fly over some Nogs and drop some pamphlets about love and peace, fly back later and napalm the ****s. Schizophrenic behaviour; hard to defend allies like that, but we tried”

A third journey I’m taking into 1960s Vietnam is through the 1980s series China Beach. I’m sure I watched some of it when it was first screened 30 or so years ago, but apart from a couple of the characters I don’t remember much.china-beach-season-1

I saw it described as M*A*S*H without the laugh-track – but I don’t think the comparison is fair.

So far I’ve only seen the 90 minute pilot and the first episode and it hasn’t really jogged my memory of any previous viewings.

The opening sequence of the pilot is very evocative in portraying the absurdity and incongruity of the conflict. It starts with a young woman in a red bikini, sitting on a beach. Her solitude is disturbed by the increasing volume of an approaching helicopter. She rises and starts walking away from the beach, firstly through tropical beachside bushes, that start giving way to sandbags, barbed wire, armed soldiers in uniform, and eventually the landing helicopter bringing its cargo of dead and wounded. The woman grabs a surgical smock and puts it on over her bikini…

One clear similarity with M*A*S*H, and the main reason for my interest in the series, is that it’s main character is a nurse in a military hospital, and there’s a regular influx of dust off helicopters bringing casualties to be put back together. Last year I read a few books by (or about) former Vietnam war nurses, and through their eyes got a very different perspective of the war and its human cost, and it’s that aspect that most interests me, so I’m looking forward to having time to watch more of China Beach.

 

nurse badge

Australian Vietnam nurse’s collar badge from my collection.

 

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4 thoughts on ““My War”


  1. Do you recognize these planes… I’m guessing from WWII, but I don’t know a lot about the insignias and all that. I’m going to guess France?

  2. I find the topic a bit overwhelming. I’m glad you’re studying it and sharing about it. I remember when I learned we had fought together with Russia to win WWII. That was back when they were the clear bogeyman — and not our president’s personal financier and aspiration. The first time I voted was to re-elect Reagan, but I was learning about political stances and principles long before that. (I would’ve been able to vote for the Republican Party’s subsequently-misrepresented previous [prior to Trump] icon the first time, had I been of age when graduating high school.)

    I remember asking an important man (in my life, not a famous man) if he knew we had joined with the Soviets. The answer was a simple yes… no explanation or lamentation. Meanwhile, I didn’t know of our having backed Ho Chi Minh. And I knew nothing about the Vietnam war other than that it was happening (and anti-Communist). I have a friend who became a journalist who (our having met in college) told me of writing poetry and crying about the Kent State tragedy when it happened, so, when we were very young. I hadn’t known* anything about it when we were kids, not even that it happened.

    It sort of boggles my mind that I was being deeply indoctrinated in a political point of view [not in my schools] while being shielded from current realities and events. Nevertheless, as I became a responsible voter, I paid attention to what we (the leaders and larger culture, including the people in my camp) were saying about Afghanistan when Russia was in there. The arguments for our helping them to fight against Russia were no longer only about communism (although that wasn’t a past concept either). There was self-determination and self-governance. The terrain gave hope for Russian loss.

    * She had grown up in that state (Ohio); I hadnt. But…

    {I’ve also heard, recently, that the state I grew up in never went through the civil rights era conflict that occurred across the rest of the country. The civil rights era is something I also didn’t hear about. Well, only slightly. I thought it was long resolved.}

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