Reader’s Block

Have you ever experienced those weeks where one day you are extremely enthusiastic about reading, you have a book you’re loving – and then the next day all motivation to read has gone.

That is what has happened to me. I was getting along very well with The Blind Man’s Garden. I even took it with me on a weekend away for Gloria’s birthday and read a few chapters. But since I returned home I haven’t opened the book.

Most of my reading is done at work in lunch and tea breaks (smoko breaks in the local lingo), but my mind has been elsewhere. We’ve been going through major changes at work, most of them unnecessary, so there’s been quite a lot of stress over that.

And of course, news events over the last week have also been a distraction starting with the Boston Marathon bombings. I was trying to keep up to date with that and writing a few thoughts on my Onesimus Files blog, as well as contributing opinions to other sites. Hopefully, now that things have begun to settle down a little, I can get back to reading the excellent book that inspired my enthusiasm a week and a half ago.

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3 Responses to Reader’s Block

  1. Marleen says:

    I was enjoying reading a novel (which, as I’ve indicated, is new for me to do without feeling like I should be doing something else), but then I had to admit I really had to be doing something else (while I’m often wishing I didn’t sign up to be obligated so). The pace of the course I’m taking (in environmental biology) has picked up significantly and won’t be letting up until it’s over in a few weeks.

    It didn’t hurt I was repelled from watching news when the bombing happened in Boston. I normally want to have more than one news show on television every day; I tuned out for a little bit (as best I could, though I heard of other matters happening at the same time because of the radio in the car). Then I was drawn back in when it seemed eminent that the terrorists would soon be caught — and the general public was helping.

    Last semester, I had to study for the last test of a course (on government) just exactly when the Sandy Hook shooting happened. The nine-one-one bombing didn’t effect me a lot, but that incident with the children had me crying over and over; and I didn’t know if I’d be able to concentrate and get through to the end of my classwork. I can hardly believe, now, Congress couldn’t pass something about even gun trafficking; I do hope they’ll try over.

    I turned in a take-home test today and have a few moments to breathe. I’m feeling disoriented; days before the bombing, someone had brought up an old terrorist/extremist story on a forum as if it were current. Discussion there and elsewhere displays Christians “all over the place” in terms of if they think terrorism is happening at all (because what’s really untrustworthy is our government in some Christian minds) while they say Muslims are terrible anyway. Today, I watched someone on FOXnews rage strangely.

    The best thing I heard — tonight — was on a comedy news parody show… something about Chechnya being about as familiar to Americans as if it were a suburb of Narnia. And the Arab person speaking (a comedian) was saying people like him were relieved we all found out the terrorists were literally as caucasian as you can get (from the Caucasus Mountains area). {Thus, they won’t even play the part of Lewis’ suspect “darkies” (who never-the-less turned out to be trustworthy and trustable) unless we only mean dark hair color.} Just prior, Jon Stewart pondered whether someone nudging us to know Chechnya is not the Czech Republic was saying we’re stupid.

    • Onesimus says:

      I’ve started reading The Blind Man’s Garden again. It seems very relevant at a time when terrorism is again being linked to Islamic extremists. The book shows that extremism isn’t one sided – and that it is the “average” person who is most likely to suffer.

  2. Marleen says:

    O’Reilly said as soon as he heard who the bombers were, everyone knew… just knew.

    I have to admit it’s likely we had suspicions, but that’s not KNOWING.

    You have to go through the process of fact-finding.

    I’ll put the book on my list.

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